This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  cm-admin 2 years, 5 months ago.


  • Author
  • #857

    cm-admin
    Keymaster

    By asking yourself the following questions your understanding of the object and its construction will increase.

    • How is the object assembled? For example, is the base attached or separate? Will lifting it cause stress on any areas? How robust are the joins? Are the attached parts designed to be weight bearing?
    • What is the surface made of? Is it vulnerable to damage from pressure, abrasion or surface soiling?
    • Are there existing areas of damage, repaired or otherwise? Will these be vulnerable during the proposed move?
    • Are there loose or hinged parts, such as doors or drawers on furniture?

    Now that you have a greater understanding of the object’s construction, you must decide on the safest and most appropriate method of lifting and transporting the object. It is important to be thinking about the following points when making your decisions.

    • The base is usually the strongest point as it is designed to be weight bearing.
    • Arms or legs of furniture, and handles are usually the weakest points since their point of attachment to the main body of the object is usually small.
      Correct handling of object, supported at strongest point

      Correct handling of object, supported at strongest point

      Incorrect handling of object, as weight is carried on the weakest points

      Incorrect handling of object, as weight is carried on the weakest points

    • Secure loose or hinged parts, such as doors or drawers, using padded ropes.
    • Use both hands when lifting – use one to support the object from below while steadying the object with the other on one side. This applies to small and medium sized objects.
      Supporting small object from below and the side

      Supporting small object from below and the side

    • Decide on how many people are required to lift or carry the object, based on the object’s shape and dimensions as well as its weight.
    • Always lift, never push or drag an object.
    • Make sure weight is distributed evenly when carrying or putting down an object. Avoid carrying or resting an object down on its side or corner.
    • Use carts, trolleys or trays when necessary in order to rest the object’s weight where it was designed to rest, usually its base or feet.
      058
    • Use supports to secure the object on a cart, trolley or tray. Large or heavy objects may need padded ropes, padded blocks and blankets. Small objects may need cushions or pads.
      075

    As well as developing an understanding of safe ways to handle objects, it is also important to prepare the space around the object prior to handling or movement. Providing clear and adequate access to and around items will help prevent unnecessary dangers.

  • #859

    cm-admin
    Keymaster

    – Develop a simple handling procedures manual.
    – Outline route, preparing the destination in which the object is to be placed, ensuring adequate number of people available to assist and consideration of any vulnerabilities of the object prior to relocation.
    – Keep clean gloves and other handling supports readily available.
    – Train staff in safe handling practices, focusing on objects typical to your collection.
    – Clearly label storage boxes, folders and shelves and the information therein, to minimise unnecessary handling.
    – Maintain the database or object log with up-to-date locations.


You must be logged in to reply to this topic.